Twitter

What does HT mean on Twitter?

Have you ever seen a tweet beginning with ‘HT’ rather than the more frequently encountered ‘RT‘ (‘retweet’, the Twitter equivalent of forwarding on an email) and wondered what it meant?

You’re not alone.

HT‘ is variously defined as either ‘Hat tip‘ or ‘Heard through‘. Either way, the tag signifies who made you, the poster, aware of the content originally.

Firstly, ‘HT’ saves you a character if you use it instead of ‘via’ (I know, try to contain your excitement).

Secondly, it’s important to always acknowledge the source of the content we redistribute. Don’t even consider clipping the text from a tweet that has wowed you and posting it as your own discovery. For one thing, it’s rude. Also, be mindful of the fact that there’s nowhere to hide on Twitter; whilst our individual follower group is unique (probably) to us, there will doubtless be a good deal of overlap with other users’ followers.

In short: someone will have seen that the tweet was someone else’s curated work, and whilst they may not call you out for having pilfered it, they’re probably going to dock you a few points mentally as a slightly less upstanding, less trustworthy member of their community.

So: don’t do it: HT it.

Need help with social business development or content-driven communication programmes? Click on the @ sign in the right hand column to email me, use the Twitter link, or feel free to reach out via any of the other social networks listed above. I look forward to hearing from you :)

Edit: many thanks to DanJDubya for pointing out that there are non-Anglophone variations on this theme such as ‘QT’ or ‘Quote tweet’ which Japanese users apparently favour. Fascinating!

About these ads

12 thoughts on “What does HT mean on Twitter?

  1. Pingback: Retweet Glossary, Syntax and Punctuation

  2. Pingback: Réseaux Sociaux by trihue - Pearltrees

  3. Pingback: Twitter & Re-Tweet Resources « FORMeika

  4. “In short: someone will have seen that the tweet was someone else’s curated work, and whilst they may not call you out for having pilfered it, they’re probably going to dock you a few points mentally as a slightly less upstanding, less trustworthy member of their community.”

    I can’t see how this is true. Under that logic, we shouldn’t thank anyone, ever, for being the pass-through source of information. Sites like Engadget gained their credibility in their early days for always documenting where they got the news from, not just the actual source.

    Is it intellectually necessary? No. Will the people you tip the hat to appreciate it? Yes. And in networking, especially long-term networking, that in my view has become essential.

  5. Sorry, disregard that last comment, I see what you were saying now… that paragraph read to me initially like you were providing a contrarian view opposing HTs. I re-read the second paragraph and get it now.

    • Rebecca, I would guess you would use it when someone has not tweeted in the first place. In other words your reference is a web page or some other site. Maybe symantics, but…

  6. Pingback: Healthcare Innovation; Find Inspiration Across Industries | Part 1 | HL7 Standards

  7. Pingback: Healthcare Innovation: Find Inspiration Across Industries

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s